ROLLING STONE MAGAZINE’S TOP 100 ALBUMS OF ALL TIME


SOURCE : ROLLING STONE MAGAZINE’S TOP 500 ALBUMS OF ALL TIME (IF YOU WANT TO SEE THE REST OF THE LIST, HIT UP ROLLING STONES, TOO MANY TO NAME HERE….)

1. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, The Beatles
2.
Pet Sounds, The Beach Boys
3.
Revolver, The Beatles
4.
Highway 61 Revisited, Bob Dylan
5.
Rubber Soul, The Beatles
6.
What’s Going On, Marvin Gaye
7.
Exile on Main Street, The Rolling Stones
8.
London Calling, The Clash
9.
Blonde on Blonde, Bob Dylan
10.
The Beatles (“The White Album”), The Beatles
11.
The Sun Sessions, Elvis Presley
12.
Kind of Blue, Miles Davis
13.
Velvet Underground and Nico, The Velvet Underground
14.
Abbey Road, The Beatles
15.
Are You Experienced?, The Jimi Hendrix Experience
16.
Blood on the Tracks, Bob Dylan
17.
Nevermind, Nirvana
18.
Born to Run, Bruce Springsteen
19.
Astral Weeks, Van Morrison
20.
Thriller, Michael Jackson
21.
The Great Twenty-Eight, Chuck Berry
22.
Plastic Ono Band, John Lennon
23.
Innervisions, Stevie Wonder
24.
Live at the Apollo (1963), James Brown
25.
Rumours, Fleetwood Mac
26.
The Joshua Tree, U2
27.
King of the Delta Blues Singers, Vol. 1, Robert Johnson
28.
Who’s Next, The Who
29.
Led Zeppelin, Led Zeppelin
30.
Blue, Joni Mitchell
31.
Bringing It All Back Home, Bob Dylan
32.
Let It Bleed, The Rolling Stones
33.
Ramones, Ramones
34.
Music From Big Pink, The Band
35.
The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars, David Bowie
36.
Tapestry, Carole King
37.
Hotel California, The Eagles
38.
The Anthology, 1947 – 1972, Muddy Waters
39.
Please Please Me, The Beatles
40.
Forever Changes, Love
41.
Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols, The Sex Pistols
42.
The Doors, The Doors
43.
The Dark Side of the Moon, Pink Floyd
44.
Horses, Patti Smith
45.
The Band, The Band
46.
Legend, Bob Marley and the Wailers
47.
A Love Supreme, John Coltrane
48.
It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back, Public Enemy
49.
At Fillmore East, The Allman Brothers Band
50.
Here’s Little Richard, Little Richard
51.
Bridge Over Troubled Water, Simon and Garfunkel
52.
Greatest Hits, Al Green
53.
The Birth of Soul: The Complete Atlantic Rhythm and Blues Recordings, 1952 – 1959, Ray Charles
54.
Electric Ladyland, The Jimi Hendrix Experience
55.
Elvis Presley, Elvis Presley
56.
Songs in the Key of Life, Stevie Wonder
57.
Beggars Banquet, The Rolling Stones
58.
Trout Mask Replica, Captain Beefheart and His Magic Band
59.
Meet the Beatles, The Beatles
60.
Greatest Hits, Sly and the Family Stone
61.
Appetite for Destruction, Guns n’ Roses
62.
Achtung Baby, U2
63.
Sticky Fingers, The Rolling Stones
64.
Phil Spector, Back to Mono (1958 – 1969), Various Artists
65.
Moondance, Van Morrison
66.
Led Zeppelin IV, Led Zeppelin
67.
The Stranger, Billy Joel
68.
Off the Wall, Michael Jackson
69.
Superfly, Curtis Mayfield
70.
Physical Graffiti, Led Zeppelin
71.
After the Gold Rush, Neil Young
72.
Purple Rain, Prince
73.
Back in Black, AC/DC
74.
Otis Blue, Otis Redding
75.
Led Zeppelin II, Led Zeppelin
76.
Imagine, John Lennon
77.
The Clash, The Clash
78.
Harvest, Neil Young
79.
Star Time, James Brown
80.
Odessey and Oracle, The Zombies
81.
Graceland, Paul Simon
82.
Axis: Bold as Love, The Jimi Hendrix Experience
83.
I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You, Aretha Franklin
84.
Lady Soul, Aretha Franklin
85.
Born in the U.S.A., Bruce Springsteen
86.
Let It Be, The Beatles
87.
The Wall, Pink Floyd
88.
At Folsom Prison, Johnny Cash
89.
Dusty in Memphis, Dusty Springfield
90.
Talking Book, Stevie Wonder
91.
Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, Elton John
92.
20 Golden Greats, Buddy Holly
93.
Sign ‘o’ the Times, Prince
94.
Bitches Brew, Miles Davis
95.
Green River, Creedence Clearwater Revival
96.
Tommy, The Who
97.
The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, Bob Dylan
98.
This Year’s Model, Elvis Costello
99.
There’s a Riot Goin’ On, Sly and the Family Stone
100.
In the Wee Small Hours, Frank Sinatra

10 responses to “ROLLING STONE MAGAZINE’S TOP 100 ALBUMS OF ALL TIME

  1. Wow… definitely feeling that list… ALOT OF BEATLES AND ELVIS.. NOT MANY MJ LOLI think the Beatles and Led Zepplin have the biggest presence on this list. Sgt. Peppers is an ill album but I disagree with it being #1… Def in the top 5 though. I would like to have seen Led Zepplins self titled album in the top 3 as well. Def a good post..

  2. In the top 100, no Chicago + no Earth, Wind and Fire = no credibility. Just my opinion.

  3. Sorry, JS was me, I didn't know my wife was signed in.

  4. I definitely agree with the Earth wind and fire comment, but I cant agree with your Chicago statement. WHile I think CHicago wis definitely top 100 bands of all time (possibly in the top 50) and they had awesome hits, my favorite being 'saturday in the park'… not one album strictly stood out in my eyes. What did they have like 20 Chicago titled albums and about 5 to 6 of them were great (mostly from the early years Chicago Transit, Chicago V (my favorite) and pretty much CHicago III through VII. But they each had like 1 or 2 or 3 great hits and the rest were just ok. COmpared to bands like Led Zepplin and The Beatles or The Doors or The ROlling stones, where 99% of their albums were hits.They have sold like 125 million records worldwide or something like that and that just proves how good their compilation of work was, but I can't really pick one to throw in the top 100… MAYBE Chicago V. But I definitely respect that opinion.

  5. Hey Wally G., the list is littered with greatest hits, compilations, anthologies, etc. Thus Chicago IX HAS TO BE THERE. It didn't include Old Days so it was incomplete, but they could only fit so much on an album. And the fact that they left it off only speaks to their body of work at that time. IX can stand with any other Pop Rock albums of the last 60 years. OMG, I just had the urge to fight for the Electric Light Orchestra, so before I lose what street cred I have left, I'm out.

  6. Hahah good ish Dwane… Im with you on ELO also… Time definitely one of the most influential albums to me when it comes to song writing and poetry and ish like that…Discovery, Out of the blue and even xanadu (the one wit Olivia Newton John) were ill albums… ELO/Chicago..definitely a pretty good time in music… Even though I'm only 24, i know my music from The platters to the zombies to led zepplin to nas and atmosphere… lol

  7. I can't mess with you brother. 24?!?!?! Much respect. I run the spectrum from Scott Joplin (the first rock star) to Linkin' Park (they'll never get the respect they deserve). Check out this link with Chuck D., my cousin Kyle and Common performing with Muddy Water's Electric Mudd Cats. This is how you bring it all together.

  8. That was a great link Dwane!I love it when artist from specific genre's collab with artists from other genre's. Prime example was Run DMC w/ Aerosmith, Puff daddy w/Nirvanna-Teen Spirit rendition, Jay-Z w/ Linkin Park, Method Man w/ Mary J, and so on…People who are real music lovers appreciate the flexability, intergration of different sounds,and passion that comes out of it; and because there is no real RADIO market for it those numbers will never factor in this public rating.

  9. Def sounds ill Dwane, but videos are blocked at work lol.. I gotta wait til later to check it out but def sound cool… I agree Moist… I love it when Rap and Rock mix… Thats why i love when rappers spit over rock samples… Also guys like Slug from Atmosphere, Brother Ali and MF Doom like to incorporate alot of rock into their beats or overall feel of their music. ALot of people don't understand the influence of rock and roll on the music these days. Id have to say 75% of 'beats' made these days have some sort of sample from an old song. I was actually listening to the Best of Otis Redding the other day and almost every song I could recognize where a modern day song got their sample from. Definitely need to pay homage to the guys who started it all and we need to give more props to rock and roll. Shit, believe it or not, Jim Morrison got me into writting hiphop and it was then when I started recording and making rap music. When it comes to music, its prose/poetry first, musical/beats second… in my opinion at least… but they both need to coexist in order to have a hit… Zepplin was the king of that ish.

  10. "When it comes to music, its prose/poetry first, musical/beats second… in my opinion at least… but they both need to coexist in order to have a hit…"Now that's wisdom.Its funny, my fifteen year old gave me my introduction to MF Doom last weekend, but I'm a fan now. I come from a family of "almost made it" artists, and I know alot about the roots and rites of the music industry. When he was accepted in the Rock and Roll hall of Fame, Billy Joel told that audience that although they criticized him for being derivative, if it weren't for being derivative there wouldn't be a White artist in the room cause they all stole from somebody. On the flip side, Smokey Robinson told a group of hip hop artists that they as a group will never be as good as previous generations because now producers are trying to find the "next" Jay-Z, Kanye, Anthony Hamilton, etc., while back in his day if you sounded remotely like anyone else a producer wouldn't touch you. Then it was innovation, not its replication. Almost the only new way to make music is to combine old ways (Pete Rock is the master).Here is a hybrid for you. Check out Confrontation Camps "Objects in the Mirror…" Let me know what you think.

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